Aviation for Women

MAR-APR 2018

Aviation for Women is the flagship member publication of Women in Aviation International. Articles feature women who have made aviation history, professional development ideas, and current-topic articles.

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16 AviationforWomen M A R C H / A P R I L 2 0 1 8 My Mentor and Me: TAR A AND BETH Tara Creel-Cesena, WAI 74090 and now general manager of Cutter Aviation at the Phoenix-Deer Valley (Arizona) Airport, met her mentor Beth Mann, WAI 30329, when they both worked at Mesa Airlines in the purchasing department. Tara moved on to Cutter, and Beth moved on to Able Aerospace Services Inc. in Mesa. Their friendship and mentoring relationship endure. TAR A W hat Tara admires most in Beth : I admire Beth's passion for aviation the most. She is a smart woman who has the confidence to run with any challenge given to her. Overall takeaway from Beth's mentoring: I re- member how she treated us as employees, so when I stepped into a management position, I wanted others to feel the way Beth made me feel. Beth is the type of manager who cares about her staff; she leads by example. I feel that I have that same relationship with my team. Best thing about Beth as a men- tor: Beth has always pushed me to do greater things. I cannot pin one "best advice" that she has given me. Working under her su- pervision for four years, I gained a lot of knowledge. Paying it forward as a mentor herself: Being in management, I feel that I have mentored many, but one who stands out the most is Cassidy-rae Troupe. I call her my mini-me. Al- though she is very young and has only a couple of years in aviation, I see a bright future for her. Three-word de- scription of my mentor and me: Re- lationship of trust. BETH What caught your attention about Tara: Tara's drive a nd t he spark in her eyes. She is ver y smart and was extremely interested in learn- ing all she could about aviation and the jobs we had her do. She never stepped down from a challenge, new project or having to manage another buyer's account if they were out. I love how she never gave up even during the tough- est of times at our airline. She always found a way to help get the planes flying! Paying back my own mentor: I had the pleasure of having several mentors, but one stuck with me and is still there if I ever have a question: Mike Rodriguez. He was one of the purchas- ing managers at Mesa Airlines. Mike was very tough, but soft at the same time. He had a way of explaining processes and helping me grow. He provided me with the tools to succeed, and be- cause of some of his wisdom I believe I am where I am today. He never stops teaching. Proud mentor: Watching Tara grow into the woman she is... She has taken some of the tools I have provided, along with her knowledge and tools she received from others, and continues to grow and conquer her goals. I am so ver y proud of how far she has come. From [her first job in] daycare to aviation, she has been a true gem to mentor and work with. Difference between a mentor and a friend : A mentor would be someone who ha s gone through the same situations the mentee is go- ing through. A mentor would share her ways and help guide the mentee down the path that would help her succeed or give the tools needed to make the right choices or decisions. A men- tor could help guide as she moves forward with a company or life career choice. The mentor would be in the teacher role, and could be called at any time to ask questions and or guidance. A friend is someone you share common interests with and spend time with away from the work setting. A friend is what Tara became to me. I consider her and her family to be family! Some get lucky enough to call their mentee's a friend outside of work, I am very lucky to have men- tored her and also become her friend. Three-word description of my mentee and me: Friends for life. ✈ Beth Mann Tara Creel-Cesena

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